Wombwell Sightseeing Guide

Wombwell in England (region) with it's 15,518 inhabitants is a city in United Kingdom - about 149 mi (or 240 km) North of London, the country's capital. To learn more about Wombwell in general, check the Wombwell destination guide. These are some of the noteworthy things about this place.

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Table of Content

Map of local sightseeing hints

The map features the more popular and well known points of interest from this area.

30 sightseeing spots quickly introduced

Distances are based on the centre of the city/town and sightseeing location. This list contains brief abstracts about monuments, holiday activities, national parcs, museums, organisations and more from the area as well as interesting facts about the region itself. Where available, you'll find the corresponding homepage. Otherwise the related wikipedia article.

Barnsley (speedway)

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 3 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Barnsley were a British speedway team from Barnsley, England, that competed in the English Dirt Track League in the inaugural season of British Speedway in 1929.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Defunct British speedway teams

Barnsley East and Mexborough (UK Parliament constituency)

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Barnsley East and Mexborough was a Parliamentary constituency in South Yorkshire which returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. The constituency was created in 1997, partially replacing Barnsley East, and was a safe seat for the Labour Party. At the 2010 general election, it was largely replaced by a re-established Barnsley East constituency.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Mexborough
  • Parliamentary constituencies in Yorkshire and the Humber (historic)
  • Politics of Barnsley
  • United Kingdom Parliamentary constituencies disestablished in 2010
  • United Kingdom Parliamentary constituencies established in 1997

Carlton Main Brickworks

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 3 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Carlton Main Brickworks is a 15.5 hectare (38.4 acre) geological site of Special Scientific Interest in South Yorkshire. The site was notified in 1989.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Sites of Special Scientific Interest in South Yorkshire
  • Sites of Special Scientific Interest notified in 1989

Cat Hill Tunnel

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Cat Hill Tunnel was the name of a railway tunnel that ran through Darfield, South Yorkshire, England, leading to Darfield railway station (now closed). The tunnel was built by George Stephenson for the North Midland Railway opened in 1840. It was 154 yards long (one of the longest in the region) and ran under fields into Darfield station from the Cathill Road end of Darfield. The railway bridge was removed in the 1990s. Steps that led to Darfield station may be found beyond the western abutment. The station was originally at the Broomhill end of the tunnel but in 1880 was moved nearer to the road when the tunnel was 'scalped' into a cutting. The remains of Darfield station can be found at its former Doncaster Road site. The original station was built 45 chains to the south at the Cathill Road site near to Broomhill in 1840.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • History of Yorkshire
  • Midland Railway
  • Rail transport in South Yorkshire
  • Railway tunnels in England
  • Tunnels completed in 1840

Cortonwood

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Cortonwood Colliery was sunk in 1873, a year after the formation of the Brampton Colliery Company, which took its name from the local parish of Brampton Bierlow, near Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. In March 1984, the National Coal Board announced that the mine was due to close, this becoming the "final straw" which brought about the long-running UK miners' strike (1984–1985). The site has now been converted into a shopping and leisure area. It features big names such as B&Q, Matalan, Next, Boots, Morrisons, McDonalds, Argos, Pizza Hut, Asda Living, Sports World, SCS, Halfords, Smyths Toys and many factories and office buildings. Problems relating to access to the site occur mainly at weekends. It is likely that there will be traffic jams trying to enter the area on a Saturday or Sunday due to the poor design of the entrance road. This problem is taking time to resolve as the feeder roads come under the governance of Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Council though the trading estate itself is within the Metropolitan Borough of Rotherham.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Coal mines in Rotherham
  • Coal mines in South Yorkshire
  • History of South Yorkshire
  • Underground mines in England

Dearne FM

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Dearne FM homepage

Dearne FM is an Independent Local Radio station which broadcasts to the Barnsley area. The station is owned and operated by the Lincs FM Group, whose stations take more of an interest in their local areas than other larger radio companies, and offer a wider type of music.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Media in Barnsley
  • Radio stations established in 2003
  • Radio stations in Yorkshire

Elsecar Collieries

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

The Elsecar Collieries were a series of coal mines sunk in and around Elsecar, a small village to the south of Barnsley in what is now South Yorkshire, but was traditionally in the West Riding of Yorkshire. The last operating mine, Elsecar Main, closed in 1984 and with its closure ended 230 years of mining in the village

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • 1984 disestablishments
  • Coal mines in South Yorkshire
  • History of Barnsley
  • Underground mines in England

Elsecar Heritage Centre

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Elsecar Heritage Centre homepage

Elsecar Heritage Centre is a Living History centre in Elsecar, South Yorkshire. It also comprises various shops, galleries, art studios and an exhibition hall. It runs craft workshops, special events, and a monthly antiques fair. The buildings were originally used for various industries including ironworks and forges, a distillery, and engineering workshops. These fell into decline when the coal mines in the village closed. It also has its own Elsecar goods station (called Rockingham Station) on the Elsecar Steam Railway, with a running shed behind the main centre. During some special events, trips are run to Hemingfield Basin. There are plans to extend the line to Cortonwood and build two stations (one at Cortonwood and the other at Hemingfield). The railway's depot is home to a selection of steam locomotives as well as a diesel locomotive.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Buildings and structures in Barnsley
  • Industry museums in England
  • Museums in South Yorkshire
  • Visitor attractions in Barnsley

Elsecar Heritage Railway

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

The Elsecar Heritage Railway is located on the southern part of the former South Yorkshire Railway freight-only branch which ran from Elsecar Junction on its Mexborough to Barnsley line. The line was built to serve Earl Fitzwilliam's collieries and ironworks, which he leased out to local ironmasters. The Elsecar Heritage Railway operates trains on a 1 mile section of the branch with using steam and diesel locomotives currently running between Rockingham station (at the back of the Elsecar Heritage Centre) and Hemingfield Basin. As of 2012, There are still plans to extend the line to Cortonwood (Plus a new halt will be built at Hemingfield as part of the extension project). The railway is operated using a variety of different preserved rolling stock. On 16 May 2011, the permanent way materials for the level crossing arrived and a donation scheme had been set up for the remainder of the money needed. Funds raised through this scheme have since been used to purchase barriers and traffic signals for the crossing ready for installation. In August 2012, trial holes were dug to locate services under the road surface ready for the crossing installation to take place. As of 21 June 2011, the ground has been cleared and levelled ready for ballast and track alterations in anticipation for constructing the station at Hemingfield, currently the end of the line.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Heritage railways in England
  • Rail transport in South Yorkshire
  • Visitor attractions in Barnsley
  • Visitor attractions in Doncaster

Elsecar Ironworks

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

The Elsecar Ironworks opened in 1795 in the village of Elsecar near Barnsley, South Yorkshire. The company was bankrupted in 1827 and taken over by the Wentworth estate who owned the land it stood on. The buildings are now part of the Elsecar Heritage Centre.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • 1795 establishments in England
  • Ironworks and steelworks in England

Elsecar goods station

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Elsecar goods station was a goods facility constructed near the village of Elsecar, near Barnsley, South Yorshire, at the terminus of the South Yorkshire Railways branch line from Elsecar Junction on its Mexborough to Barnsley line. The total length of the line was 2 miles 1204 yards. The line from Elsecar Junction followed closely that of the Elsecar Branch of the Dearne and Dove Canal to its terminus at Elsecar where the sidings of Earl Fitzwillian's Elsecar Colliery are alongside. Also joining the line are the exchange sidings of Lidgett Colliery, reached by an incline from a triangular junction in the yard. The route of this tramway can still be seen today running between the hedgerows towards its summit and the point where it turns towards the colliery. In 1930 the facilities in the yard included a goods shed with crane and sidings to the Elsecar Ironworks, the local gas works as well as the building containing Earl Fitzwilliam's private railway station and other warehouse facilities. The facilities were closed in the early 1970s.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Disused railway goods stations in the United Kingdom
  • Disused railway stations in Barnsley

Hoober Observatory

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 3 mi away.
More reading: Hoober Observatory homepage

J A Jones Hoober Observatory is a privately owned observatory located in South Yorkshire, England near to the villages of Hoober and Wentworth, 4 miles North-northwest of Rotherham. It can be found about 300 metres east of Hoober Stand. The observatory is owned and operated by Mexborough & Swinton Astronomical Society.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • 1978 establishments in England
  • 1993 establishments in England
  • Amateur astronomy organizations
  • Astronomical observatories in England
  • Buildings and structures in Rotherham
  • Domes
  • Mexborough
  • Organisations based in South Yorkshire
  • Swinton, South Yorkshire

Hoober Stand

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 3 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Hoober Stand is a 30-metre high building situated on a ridge in Wentworth, South Yorkshire in northern England. It was designed by Henry Flitcroft for the Whig aristocrat Thomas Watson-Wentworth, Earl of Malton (later the 1st Marquess of Rockingham) to commemorate the quashing of the 1745 Jacobite rebellion, and lies close to his country seat Wentworth Woodhouse. It is approximately 157m above sea level, and from the top there are magnificent, long distance views on a clear day. It is open to the public 2–5 p.m. on Sundays and bank holiday Mondays from the Spring bank holiday weekend until the last Sunday in September. Hoober Stand is one of several follies in and around Wentworth Woodhouse park. The others include Needle's Eye and Keppels Column.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Buildings and structures in Rotherham
  • Folly buildings in England
  • Towers completed in 1748

Little Houghton, South Yorkshire

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Little Houghton is a hamlet and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Barnsley, South Yorkshire, England. At the 2001 census it had a population of 618. Access to the hamlet of Little Houghton is gained by travelling along Middlecliff Lane through the village of Middlecliffe. The larger village is made up of mainly council and ex-council houses. Little Houghton was previously the site of two large coal mines. Houghton Main was a deep shaft mine and Dearne Valley a drift mine. Both mines are now closed and their sites have been landscaped, which has been partly funded by money from the European Union. Before the coal mines, the village was involved in agriculture and there were a number of farms in the village with associated cottages. Only two of the old farm buildings remain, but some have recently been converted into housing. The two settlements come under Little Houghton Parish Council.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Geography of Barnsley
  • Villages in South Yorkshire

Lowe Stand

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 3 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Lowe Stand is an 18th century folly built for Thomas Watson-Wentworth, 1st Marquess of Rockingham, and likely originally intended as a hunting lodge. It is situated in the South Yorkshire town of Hoyland, 5 miles southeast of Barnsley. Today the stand is a Grade II listed building but is in a fairly advanced state of decay.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Buildings and structures in Barnsley
  • Folly buildings in England
  • Grade II listed buildings in South Yorkshire

Middlecliffe

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Middlecliffe is a small South Yorkshire hamlet straddling the road between Darfield and Great Houghton, close to Barnsley, where Middlecliff Lane joins the B6273 road. It is mostly a collection of current and former council houses, served by a Post Office, small corner shop and a Working Mens club. Often confused with Little Houghton, the civil parish of which it forms a part, the village is served by two bus stops. Middlecliffe is the birthplace of footballer Wilf Copping, who played for Leeds United and Arsenal in the 1930s.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Geography of Barnsley
  • Villages in South Yorkshire

Millhouses, Barnsley

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Millhouses is a district of Barnsley in the English county of South Yorkshire. Millhouses adjoins the town of Darfield near the A635 road to the east of Barnsley itself.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Geography of Barnsley
  • Villages in South Yorkshire

Milton Ironworks

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Elsecar, near Barnsley, South Yorkshire, England was, until the 18th century, a mainly agricultural village on the estate of Earl Fitzwilliam. Coal and Iron had been worked from small pits around the village since the late 14th century, particularly in Tankersley Park.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Companies based in Barnsley
  • History of Barnsley
  • Ironworks and steelworks in England

Oaks viaduct

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 3 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Oaks Viaduct was Britain's largest railway bridge that spanned the Dearne Valley, in South Yorkshire. The viaduct crossed Rotherham Road at Lundwood, and spanned across the Dearne Valley including the Dearne and Dove Canal, to the other side, connecting with Barnsley Colliery, and joined the existing Barnsley - Sheffield line. It served as an alternative line for trains between Leeds and Sheffield on the Midland Railway's main line forming the last link in the Cudworth to Wincobank "Chapeltown loop". This allowed trains to avoid congestion in the Wath-upon-Dearne and Swinton areas, albeit by the slower and more hilly line. The "Cudworth Flyer" local train from Barnsley, connecting with Midland line trains at Cudworth, also passed over the viaduct. It also served as a railway for the coal industry, allowing access to the many rail-connected collieries in the area, serving Wombwell Main, Darfield Main and Wath Main Colliery. In 1965, the bridge was deemed unsafe, leading to the withdrawal of all train services and the eventual demolition of the bridge.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Bridges in South Yorkshire
  • Buildings and structures in Barnsley
  • Demolished bridges
  • Rail transport in South Yorkshire
  • Railway bridges in England

Old Holy Trinity Church, Wentworth

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 3 mi away.
More reading: Old Holy Trinity Church, Wentworth homepage

The Old Holy Trinity Church, Wentworth, is a redundant Anglican church in the village of Wentworth, South Yorkshire, England. It is partly in ruins, and stands close to a newer church also dedicated to the Holy Trinity. The old church has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade II* listed building, and is in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Churches preserved by the Churches Conservation Trust
  • English Gothic architecture
  • Grade II* listed buildings in South Yorkshire

Old Moor Wetland Centre RSPB reserve

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Old Moor Wetland Centre RSPB reserve homepage

RSPB Old Moor is a 250-acre wetlands nature reserve in Barnsley, England run by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB). It lies on the junction of the north/south and east/west routes of the Trans Pennine Trail. The centre was opened by Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Council in 1998 as part of the regeneration of the Dearne Valley and then developed further with the help of a lottery grant in 2002. The RSPB took over management of the site in 2003 and developed the site further with funding from various sources including the Heritage Lottery Fund, Yorkshire Forward and WREN. The area around RSPB Old Moor contains several other wildlife areas including Wombwell Ings and Gypsy Marsh, (which are also managed by the RSPB), Broomhill Flash and Doveside Nature Reserve.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Nature reserves in South Yorkshire
  • Royal Society for the Protection of Birds reserves in England
  • Visitor attractions in Barnsley
  • Visitor centres in England
  • Wetlands of England

Rockingham (South Yorkshire) railway station

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Rockingham (South Yorkshire) railway station is the terminus of the preserved line which is being built along the trackbed of the former Elsecar branch of the South Yorkshire Railway. The station is built within the Elsecar Heritage Centre, the former National Coal Board workshops at Elsecar. The line runs from Rockingham station to Hemingfield Basin, alongside the Elsecar Branch of the Dearne and Dove Canal but it is intended to extend the line to Cortonwood with halts at Hemingfield and Cortonwood during 2011/12.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Heritage railway stations in Barnsley

St Michael and All Angels Church, Great Houghton

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 3 mi away.
More reading: St Michael and All Angels Church, Great Houghton homepage

St Michael and All Angels Church is the parish church of Great Houghton in South Yorkshire. The church is dedicated to St Michael, and was originally a private chapel and was built by Sir Edward Rodes, the High Sheriff of Yorkshire, who was a conspicuous Parliamentarian. It was built about 1650 and used for worship by his family and the tenants of his land. Sir Edward was a great friend of Oliver Cromwell, when he was the Lord Protector of England. He served in Cromwell’s Privy Council and was also the Colonel of his Cavalry. Cromwell visited the church on its completion and approved of its simple design. Sir Edward died on 19 February 1666 and is buried in Darfield Church. His Coat of Arms appeared in stone on the east gable of the church. This mysteriously disappeared over the years but the space where it lay still remains. The first religious ceremony in the chapel was the baptism of one of the younger sons of Sir Edward by Mr Edward Bowles of York, one of the most eminent Presbyterian clergy of his day. Richard Taylor was the first officiating minister as Chaplain to the Rodes family. He had been prevented from exercising his ministry in public by the Act of Uniformity. The Rodes family were great patrons of nonconformity. The chapel at Great Houghton must have been well known throughout the country as a haven for persecuted clergy of the period. The chapel had a succession of non-conforming ministers who existed under Rode’s protection. The chapel remained private for many years and it was not until 1849 that it became ‘Episcopally licensed’ for worship. It only became part of the Church of England (under Darfield parish) in 1906 and the first Anglican service was a Holy Communion which took place on 24 November 1908.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Church of England churches in South Yorkshire

Stairfoot rail accident

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

The Stairfoot rail accident was a railway accident that took place at Stairfoot, South Yorkshire, England. On 12 September 1870 in Barnsley top yard a rake of 10 goods wagons was standing on a gradient of 1 in 119. A single sprag between the spokes of a wheel was holding them. When two gas tank wagons were shunted against the rake, the sprag broke and the 12 wagons began to move. Two pointsmen made valiant efforts to pin down the brakes to no avail. The wagons rapidly gathered speed as the gradient increased to 1 in 72 and passed three signal boxes, none of which had points under their control to deflect the runaways. Meanwhile a passenger train which had left Barnsley at 18:15 was standing at Stairfoot station one and a half miles away. The runaways struck the rear of the standing train at a speed of at least 40 mph, killing 15 and injuring 59 more. The enquiry found that the goods guard was gravely at fault for not ensuring the standing wagons were better secured. The layout of the yard was also criticized as there were no trap points to protect the running lines in the event of such a mishap.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • 1870 in England
  • History of Barnsley
  • History of South Yorkshire
  • Rail transport in South Yorkshire
  • Railway accidents in 1870
  • Railway accidents in England
  • Runaway train disasters
  • Transport disasters in Yorkshire

Trans Pennine Trail

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Trans Pennine Trail homepage

The Trans Pennine Trail is a long-distance path running from coast to coast across northern England entirely on surfaced paths and using only gentle gradients (it runs largely along disused railway lines and canal towpaths). It forms part of European walking route E8 and is part of the National Cycle Network. The surface and gradients make it a relatively easy trail, suitable for cyclists, pushchairs and wheelchair users. Some parts are also open to horse riding. The trail is administered from a central office in Barnsley, which is responsible for promotion and allocation of funding. However, the twenty-seven local authorities whose areas the trail runs through are responsible for management of the trail within their boundaries.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Buildings and structures celebrating the third millennium
  • Long-distance footpaths in England
  • Trans Pennine Trail
  • Visitor attractions in Derbyshire

Warren House Colliery

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 3 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Warren House Colliery was a coal mine situated to the north of Rawmarsh, near Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. The colliery, within lands owned by Earl Fitzwilliam was opened in the early 19th century and closed in, or shortly after, the First World War. The pit was leased to Wakefield-based agents J. J. Charlesworth & Company. The colliery was connected underground with two other local Charlesworth pits, Warren Vale Colliery and Kilnhurst Colliery. Some remains of the colliery buildings and one of the spoil heaps still remain after almost 100 years after closure.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Coal mines in Rotherham
  • Coal mines in South Yorkshire
  • Underground mines in England

Wath Main Colliery

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Wath Main Colliery was a coal mine situated in the Dearne Valley, close by the township of Wath-upon-Dearne, South Yorkshire, England. The colliery was operated by the Wath Main Coal Company Limited. Sinking of the first of its two shafts began in 1873, the workings reaching the highly-prized Barnsley seam three years later. To gain access to lower reserves the shafts were deepened, first in 1912 to reach the Parkgate seam and then, in 1923, to the Silkstone seam. The colliery became part of the National Coal Board on nationalization in 1947 and it was amalgamated, along with other local collieries, with the adjacent Manvers Main Colliery on 1 January 1986. Closure came on 25 March 1988. The site has been reclaimed and now contains Wath Country Park, which in May 2007 was sold off to developers to form a new housing development. The park lasted just 10 years.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Coal mines in Rotherham
  • Underground mines in England
  • Wath-upon-Dearne

Wentworth (UK Parliament constituency)

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 3 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Wentworth was a parliamentary constituency in South Yorkshire. Originally created in 1918 and was abolished in 1950, the name was revived when a new constituency was created from 1983 to 2010. Throughout its history, Wentworth was a safe seat for the Labour Party.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Parliamentary constituencies in Yorkshire and the Humber (historic)
  • Politics of Barnsley
  • Politics of Rotherham
  • United Kingdom Parliamentary constituencies disestablished in 1950
  • United Kingdom Parliamentary constituencies disestablished in 2010
  • United Kingdom Parliamentary constituencies established in 1918
  • United Kingdom Parliamentary constituencies established in 1983

Wentworth Woodhouse

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 3 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

A similarly named country house in Yorkshire is Wentworth Castle. Wentworth Woodhouse is a Grade I listed country house near the village of Wentworth, in the vicinity of Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. It served as "One of the great Whig political palaces". Its East Front is 606-foot long, making it the longest country house façade in Europe. It is also the largest private house in the United Kingdom. The house comprises over 200 rooms and covers an area of over 2.5 acres . It is surrounded by a 180-acre park and by an estate of 15,000-acre, which are now separately owned. An existing Jacobean house was entirely rebuilt by Thomas Watson-Wentworth, 1st Marquess of Rockingham (1693–1750), and then reduced to the status of a mere wing by the immense scale of the new great addition made by his son the 2nd Marquess, who was twice Prime Minister, and who established at Wentworth Woodhouse an important Whig powerhouse. In the 18th century it was inherited by the Earls Fitzwilliam, who owned it until 1979 (when it passed to the heirs of the 8th and 10th Earls), having profited greatly from the great quantities of underground coal on the estate.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Buildings and structures in Rotherham
  • Country houses in South Yorkshire
  • Folly buildings in England
  • Grade I listed buildings in South Yorkshire
  • Grade I listed houses
  • Visitor attractions in Rotherham

Wentworth and Dearne (UK Parliament constituency)

Located at 53.52, -1.4 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Wentworth and Dearne is a borough constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was created for the 2010 general election, and elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Parliamentary constituencies in Yorkshire and the Humber
  • United Kingdom Parliamentary constituencies established in 2010

These abstracts have been compiled and located with the help of wikipedia.org, dbpedia.org and geonames.org.