Purley Way Sightseeing Guide

Purley Way in England (region) is a town located in United Kingdom - about 10 mi (or 16 km) South of London, the country's capital town. To learn more about Purley Way in general, check the Purley Way destination guide. These are some of the noteworthy things about this place.

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Table of Content

Map of local sightseeing hints

The map features the more popular and well known points of interest from this area.

30 sightseeing spots quickly introduced

Distances are based on the centre of the city/town and sightseeing location. This list contains brief abstracts about monuments, holiday activities, national parcs, museums, organisations and more from the area as well as interesting facts about the region itself. Where available, you'll find the corresponding homepage. Otherwise the related wikipedia article.

1924 Imperial Airways de Havilland DH.34 crash

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

The 1924 Imperial Airways de Havilland DH.34 crash occurred on 24 December 1924 when de Havilland DH.34 G-EBBX of Imperial Airways crashed at Purley, Surrey, United Kingdom killing all eight people on board. The aircraft was operating a scheduled international flight from Croydon, Surrey, to Paris, France. It was the first fatal accident suffered by Imperial Airways and led to the first public inquiry into a civil aviation accident in the United Kingdom. As a result of issues brought up during the Public Inquiry, Croydon Airport was expanded, absorbing most of Beddington Aerodrome.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • 1924 in England
  • Aviation accidents and incidents in 1924
  • Aviation accidents and incidents in England
  • Disasters in Surrey
  • Imperial Airways accidents and incidents
  • Transport in Croydon

1936 KLM Croydon accident

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

The 1936 KLM Croydon accident was the crash of a KLM airliner on 9 December 1936, shortly after taking off from the Croydon Air Port (as it was known at the time) on a scheduled flight to Amsterdam, Netherlands. The aircraft was destroyed and 15 of the 17 passengers and crew on board died as a result of the accident.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Airliner accidents and incidents caused by weather
  • Aviation accidents and incidents in 1936
  • Aviation accidents and incidents in England
  • KLM accidents and incidents

1947 Croydon Dakota accident

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

The 1947 Croydon Dakota accident occurred on the 25 January 1947 when a Spencer Airways Douglas C-47A Skytrain (Dakota) failed to get airborne from Croydon Airport, located near London, and crashed into a parked and empty CSA Douglas C-47 destroying both aircraft and killing eleven passengers and one crew member.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • 1947 in the United Kingdom
  • Accidents and incidents involving the Douglas C-47 Skytrain
  • Airliner accidents and incidents caused by pilot error
  • Aviation accidents and incidents in 1947
  • Aviation accidents and incidents in England
  • Czech Airlines accidents and incidents
  • Spencer Airways accidents and incidents

A236 road

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

The A236 is an A road in South London. It runs from the Croydon Flyover in Central Croydon to the A24 at Collier's Wood. The A236 road travels across the London Borough of Merton and the London Borough of Croydon. It's the primary road that passes through Mitcham Common. It also is the road on the one-way system in the town centre of Mitcham. In Old Town the road is part of a 3-lane dual carriageway.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Streets in Croydon
  • Transport in Merton

Bandon Halt railway station

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Bandon Halt was a station on the 1847 London, Brighton and South Coast Railway extension from West Croydon to Epsom. It was situated between Waddon and Wallington stations and was open between 1906 and 1914. It takes its name from the immediate area which is called Bandon Hill. It was located at grid reference TQ301644 and was accessed from Plough Lane, the platforms lying to the immediate east of the overbridge.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Disused railway stations in Sutton (London borough)
  • Railway stations closed in 1914
  • Railway stations opened in 1906

Beanos

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Beanos homepage

Beanos was a second-hand record shop, once the largest in Europe, located in the South London suburb of Croydon. It was founded by David Lashmar in 1975 (a former member of the short-lived British musical group Dead Sea Fruit) and continued to expand through three increasingly larger shops ending up in an old printing works in Middle Street during the 1990s. After over thirty years of trading, Beanos faced the threat of closure in 2006, although the immediate threat was averted by concentrating the store's focus on rare vinyl records rather than Compact Discs which were being undercut by large music chains and supermarkets. However, in November 2008 Lashmar posted a notice on the website stating the store would have to close after Christmas of that year as sales had not picked up. The shop finally closed in the Autumn of 2009. In January 2010 David Lashmar reopened Beanos as STUFF marketplace. STUFF marketplace officially closed on 30 April 2010 due to too little business. Lashmar is currently looking for someone to buy the building to run as STUFF. The site is now host to Beanies, a child friendly cafe also offering play areas and workshops. In December 2010 David Lashmar and Beanos featured in the BBC television series Turn Back Time - The High Street. Lashmar appeared as a 1970s record shop owner trying to sell vinyl records to the public in Shepton Mallet, Somerset.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • 1975 establishments in England
  • Culture in Croydon
  • Music retailers of the United Kingdom
  • Retail companies established in 1975
  • Shopping in Croydon
  • Shops in London

Broad Green (ward)

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Broad Green is a ward in the London Borough of Croydon, corresponding to the west Croydon area of London in the United Kingdom. The much smaller area known as Broad Green is divided between this ward and the neighbouring ward of Selhurst. Broad Green extends from central Croydon to the south to the border with the London Boroughs of Sutton and Merton by Mitcham Common. The ward includes part of the retail core of Croydon and the northern part of the Purley Way retail area. Broad Green ward currently forms part of the Croydon North constituency, with Malcolm Wicks as Member of Parliament. The ward returns three councillors every four years to the Croydon Council. At the Croydon Council election, 2006, Stuart Collins, Mike Selva, and Manju Shahul-Hameed were elected to the council. All of them were running as Labour Party candidates.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Wards of Croydon

Centrale (Croydon)

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Centrale (Croydon) homepage

Centrale is a shopping centre in Croydon, South London, one of the largest covered retail developments in London. It is owned and managed by Hammerson and was opened in 2004. Plans were announced in January 2013 to redevelop Centrale and combine it with the Whitgift Centre. Centrale is located on North End, Croydon, facing the Whitgift Centre. It was developed from the existing but much smaller Drummond Centre. It now contains several large stores - House of Fraser, Debenhams and TK Maxx - and around 50 smaller stores including Next, H&M, Zara, Budwals and Build-A-Bear Workshop.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Buildings and structures in Croydon
  • Croydon 2020
  • Shopping centres in London
  • Shopping in Croydon
  • Shopping malls established in 2004
  • St Martins Property Group
  • Visitor attractions in Croydon

Centrale tram stop

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Centrale tram stop is a halt on the Tramlink service in Croydon town centre, serving the Centrale shopping centre. The tram stop was provided and paid for as part of the development of the shopping centre. The stop operates as a transport interchange with trams stopping on one side of the platform and local buses on the other. It operates, along with West Croydon and East Croydon as Tramlink interchanges within the 'Croydon Loop'. The interchange includes the tram stop for all three Tramlink lines and also includes a bus stop. This includes London Buses route 157, London Buses route 407, London Buses route 410 and London Buses route 455. Just on the other side of the road is the Centrale, there is an entrance for the main centre and also the Mecca Bingo which owns the only business on the Tamworth Road level.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Tramlink stops in Croydon

Church Street tram stop

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Church Street is a tram stop for westbound Tramlink trams in central Croydon. It serves all routes, with routes 1 and 2 turning right, to continue around the 'Croydon Loop', whereas route 3 carries on westward towards Wimbledon. 40x40px Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Church Street tram stop

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Tramlink stops in Croydon

Colonnades Leisure Park

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 0 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

The Colonnades Leisure Park (also known as Croydon Colonnades) is an out-of-town leisure park located in the Purley Way retail and industrial district of the London Borough of Croydon, South London which opened in the late 1990s. The retail park was built on the former site of the Croydon Water Palace, an indoor water park complex that opened in 1990, but had to close due to financial difficulties. The Colonnades faces tough competition with Valley Park Retail Area, the main commercial area on Purley Way and is less busy due to the lack of an anchor tenant (Valley Park has IKEA and Purley Way Retail Park has Sainsbury's). Although it is centering itself as more of an entertainment complex than shopping area. The retail park is the southern most on the A23 Purley Way road and is close to Purley town centre. The site of Croydon Airport is opposite the site of the retail Park. Most of the outlets in the park are entertainment oriented, such as City Limits an indoor entertainment centre with a restaurant, sports bar, arcade and bowling facilities. Other tenants include Gipsy Moth family pub and restaurant, Pizza Hut, McDonalds, Premier Inn, a Kidspace indoor adventure playground, and Green's health and fitness centre. A new food court has recently been opened with an indoor seating area. The restaurants in the food court include Subway, BBQ Xpress, China Wok and Karahi Cuisine. T.G.I. Friday's has a restaurant located across the road from the retail area, as well as a Hilton Hotel. The complex itself sits alongside the Purley Way Playing Fields. The City Limits complex consisting of a Bowling Alley, Laser Quest, and Gymboree has recently closed following the termination of their lease by owner Punch Taverns. Future prospects include the addition of a new concept for the UK, a drive through Costa Coffee outlet.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Leisure in Croydon
  • Retail parks in the United Kingdom

Croydon Airport

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Croydon Airport homepage

Croydon Airport was an airport in South London straddling the boundary between what are now the London boroughs of Croydon and Sutton. It was the main airport for London before it was replaced by Northolt Aerodrome, London Heathrow Airport and Gatwick Airport. The terminal building and entrance lodge are Grade II listed buildings.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Airports in the London region
  • Art Deco architecture in London
  • Croydon 2020
  • Defunct airports in England
  • Former buildings and structures of Croydon
  • Grade II listed buildings in London
  • Royal Flying Corps airfields
  • Transport in Croydon

Croydon Clocktower

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Croydon Clocktower on Katharine Street in Croydon contains the Museum of Croydon, the Riesco Gallery with a collection of Chinese pottery and ceramics, a café and bar. The museum includes exhibits about the important black composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875–1912) who lived most of his life in Croydon. The centre is owned and run by Croydon Council, and also houses Croydon's Central Library. The building links into the Town Hall and some areas of the building, most notably the Braithwaite Hall, are part of the original town hall and library complex, built in 1892–1896 to a design by Charles Henman Jun. The Clocktower is the tower of the Town Hall. New buildings were built alongside the Town Hall and were opened by Queen Elizabeth II in 1994. A notable early success was the Picasso exhibition in March to May 1995 named Picasso's Croydon Period. The Clocktower also incorporates a Youth Ambassadors group, aimed at bringing more young people to the Clocktower. The Clocktower also used to include the David Lean Cinema, for art house and independent films, and the Braithwaite Hall, which was used for concerts, theatre and children's shows, until 2011 when its funding was cut by the Council, and it lost its Arts Council RFO status.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Arts centres in London
  • Buildings and structures in Croydon
  • Clock towers in the United Kingdom
  • Culture in Croydon
  • Leisure in Croydon
  • Towers in London
  • Turret clocks
  • Visitor attractions in Croydon

Croydon Flyover

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

The Croydon Flyover is a flyover located in Croydon, London, England. It is part of the A232 road which connects Orpington with Ewell. The flyover connects Park Lane and the Croydon Underpass, on the A212 road with Duppas Hill Road. It crosses over the A236, Old Town and Southbridge Road and the A212, Lower Coombe Street. The bypass also goes over Croydon High Street close to the Croydon Clocktower. The flyover was constructed as part of a ring road scheme conceived in the Croydon Plan of 1951 that has never been completed. Landmarks passed on the flyover include the Fairfield Halls, a theatre and arts centre. The Dingwall Road multi-storey car park is entered via the bypass, plus you can see the new Centrale Shopping Centre. The nearest tube station is at Morden, six miles to the north-west, although there is a direct tram connection from Croydon to the District line terminus at Wimbledon.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Buildings and structures in Croydon
  • Elevated overpasses in London
  • Streets in Croydon

Croydon Minster

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Croydon Minster homepage

Croydon Minster is the parish and civic church of the London Borough of Croydon. There are currently more than 35 churches in the borough, with Croydon Minster being the most prominent.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Anglican Diocese of Southwark
  • Church of England churches in London
  • Churches in Croydon
  • Grade I listed buildings in London
  • History of Croydon
  • Religious buildings completed in 1870

Croydon Palace

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Croydon Palace, in Croydon, now part of south London, was the summer residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury for over 500 years. Regular visitors included Henry III and Queen Elizabeth I. Now known as 'Old Palace', the buildings are still in use as the Old Palace School, an independent girls' school of the Whitgift Foundation. The Manor of Croydon was connected with the Archbishop of Canterbury from at least the late Saxon period, and records of buildings date back to before 960. The Palace as it now exists is a group of largely 15th and 16th century buildings, "an aggregate of buildings of different castes and ages", as Archbishop Herring found it in 1754. The 15th-century Great Hall is thought to have been installed by Archbishop Stafford (d. 1452), with a late-14th-century two-storey porch and a vaulted ceiling to the lower chamber. The hall interior has a rich 16th-century timber roof and windows with interesting features such as the late Gothic interior porch. The Great Hall was partially remodelled in the 17th century by archbishops Laud and Juxon, who also rebuilt the chapel. West of the Hall are the state apartments including the first-floor Guard Room, now the school library. The room is ascribed to Archbishop Arundel (Archbishop 1396–1414), and has an arch-braced roof with carved stone supports and an oriel window. Other rooms have later panelling and fireplaces. The chapel has fine 17th-century stalls and an elaborate corner gallery. The fine altar rails are now in the Guard Room. The exterior of the whole palace is of stone or red brick, with early stone windows or Georgian sash windows. The connection of the Archbishops with Croydon was of great importance, with several being important local benefactors. Six are buried in Croydon Minster, neighbouring the Palace: John Whitgift, Edmund Grindal, Gilbert Sheldon, William Wake, John Potter and Thomas Herring. Archbishop Whitgift, who first called it a "palace", liked Croydon for "the sweetness of the place", though not all admired it, in the low-lying site which Henry VIII found "rheumatick", a place where he could not stay "without sickness". Sir Francis Bacon found it "an obscure and darke place" surrounded by its dense woodland. By the late 18th century, the Palace had become dilapidated and uncomfortable and the local area was squalid. An Act of Parliament enabled Croydon Palace to be sold and Addington Palace on the outskirts of Croydon to be bought in 1807. This became the new episcopal summer residence for much of the rest of the 19th century.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Episcopal palaces of archbishops of Canterbury
  • Grade I listed buildings in London
  • Grade I listed palaces
  • History of Croydon
  • Houses in Croydon

Croydon Water Palace

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 0 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

The Croydon Water Palace was an indoor water park complex that opened in 1990 on Purley Way in Waddon in the London Borough of Croydon, opposite Croydon Airport. It was part of the Purley Way retail development drive that occurred in the early 1990s, which also saw the creation of the Valley Park Retail Area. The Water Palace experienced continuous financial difficulties and finally closed in 1996. The Palace itself was renowned for poor health and safety, and several accidents were publicised in the local press. However this was not the main reason for the closing of the park. It featured water slides, a large jacuzzi area and a wave pool using an artificial wave making machine. There was also an on-site cafe. The Water Palace was replaced with The Colonnades leisure park in the late 1990s, featuring City Limits; an entertainment centre, with a restaurant, bar, arcade and bowling facilities.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Former buildings and structures of Croydon
  • Leisure in Croydon
  • Sport in Croydon
  • Swimming venues in London

Croydon power stations

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

The Croydon power stations refers to a pair of demolished coal-fired power stations and to a gas-fired power station in the Purley Way area of Croydon, London. The coal-fired stations operated from 1896 until 1984, and the gas-fired station opened in 1999. Croydon B power station's chimneys have been retained as a local landmark.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Coal-fired power stations in England
  • Demolished power stations in the United Kingdom
  • Former power stations in London
  • London infrastructure
  • Natural gas-fired power stations in England
  • Power stations in London

Duppas Hill

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Duppas Hill is a park, road and surrounding residential area in Waddon, near Croydon in Greater London (and historically in Surrey). It is thought to be named after a family called 'Dubber' or 'Double'. Duppas Hill has a long history of sport and recreation. It is said that jousting took place there in medieval times and the story goes that Lord William de Warenne was treacherously slain there during a joust in 1286.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Areas of London
  • Cricket grounds in London
  • Districts of Croydon
  • English cricket in the 18th century
  • History of Surrey
  • Parks and open spaces in Croydon
  • Sport in Croydon
  • Sports venues in Surrey
  • Streets in Croydon

Grants of Croydon

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Grants of Croydon is an entertainment complex at 14-32 High Street, Croydon, London. Originally built in 1894, Grants became a Grade II listed building in 1990. In 2000 Grants was re-developed into an entertainment centre. It was bought by Scottish Widows in early 2010.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Buildings and structures in Croydon
  • Grade II listed buildings in London

House of Reeves

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

House of Reeves is a family-run furniture retailer in Croydon, south London, founded in 1867. The store was one of the few buildings in Croydon to survive The Blitz during World War II. The company came to widespread public attention in August 2011, when one of its two adjacent buildings was destroyed in an arson attack during the 2011 England riots. Images of the building on fire, with firefighters unable to tackle the blaze because police could not protect them, became symbolic of the violence that spread across the country during several days of rioting and looting.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • 1867 establishments in England
  • 1867 in England
  • 2011 England riots
  • History of Croydon
  • London Borough of Croydon
  • Shops in London

Municipal Borough of Beddington and Wallington

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Beddington and Wallington was, from 1915 to 1965, a local government district in north east Surrey, England. It formed part of the London suburbs, lying within the Metropolitan Police District and the London Passenger Transport Area. In 1965 it was abolished on the creation of Greater London.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Districts abolished by the London Government Act 1963
  • History of Croydon
  • History of Sutton (London borough)
  • History of local government in London (1889–1965)
  • Municipal boroughs of England

Reeves Corner tram stop

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Reeves Corner tram stop is a halt on the Tramlink service in central Croydon. It is normally only served by trams coming from Wimbledon to Croydon; trams going in the opposite direction pass the station on the other side of the road without stopping. If an incident in Croydon town centre prevents normal service, Reeves Corner acts as the Croydon terminus for all trams from Wimbledon. The name is derived from House of Reeves, a furniture store established in 1867, of which the original building was destroyed in the 2011 England riots.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Tramlink stops in Croydon

Roundshaw

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Roundshaw is a housing estate and park in south Wallington on the eastern edge of the London Borough of Sutton. Grid Ref TQ302633. It was built on part of the site of the former Croydon Airport, and occupying roughly the area on which once stood the buildings of the first Croydon Aerodrome (the 'Plough Lane' aerodrome) which was demolished in 1928. The name comes from Roundshaw Park on the edge of the site, itself named from a round 'shaw' or grove of trees, which is still a feature. The estate is a compact one, housing some 8,000 people. It was begun in 1965, with the first tenants moving in during August 1967. Dwellings on the estate are heated from a communal boiler house. It has its own shops, a library, and a community centre; and formerly had its own public house. Roundshaw was often used as a setting for the ITV drama, The Bill. A church, opened in 1981, is used by both the Church of England and the Free Churches, which, before it was built, had collaborated in a churchless religious venture known as the 'Roundshaw Experiment'. A cross set up outside the church is made from a four-bladed propeller, or airscrew, obtained through the Croydon Airport Society. The history of the site was commemorated in various ways, including the naming of roads, and Instone Close, the high-rise block of flats demolished in November 2000, after aircraft, personalities, and firms linked with aviation. One of the schools on the site has been renamed in recent years the Amy Johnson Primary School, after the famous aviator of the 1930s and 40s, the first woman to fly solo to Australia, whose epic flight began at Croydon in May 1930. The schools on Roundshaw include, since 1975, the famous Wilson's School which moved here from Camberwell in that year. An interesting coincidence is that Sir Alan Cobham, pioneer aviator of Far Eastern and other routes, was at Wilson's School, and that at one time a name under consideration for what became Roundshaw was Cobham Park. Roundshaw Fields is the host to the Croydon Pirates, one of the most successful teams in the British Baseball Federation. The fields have 2 of the best baseball diamonds in the U.K. , meaning Croydon are often the hosts of the London Tournament and National Finals.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Areas of London
  • Districts of Croydon
  • Districts of Sutton (London borough)
  • Parks and open spaces in Croydon

Surrey Street Market

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Surrey Street Market is a street market located in Surrey Street, Croydon, south London. It operates six days a week (Monday to Saturday). It sells mainly fruit & vegetables, and a range of other items.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • History of Croydon
  • Retail markets in London
  • Shopping in Croydon
  • Streets in Croydon

Valley Park Retail Area

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Valley Park Retail and Leisure Complex is a retail park in the Purley Way retail and industrial area of the London Borough of Croydon. Valley Park was opened in 1992 on the site of the former Croydon power stations, the first of which was built in the late nineteenth century. Croydon B power station was closed in 1984 and the majority of the site cleared in 1991. However the local council ordered the station's landmark chimneys be retained, which almost put IKEA off the site, but a compromise was made that IKEA could paint the top skirt of the tower in their colours (blue and yellow).

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Leisure in Croydon
  • Retail parks in the United Kingdom
  • Shopping in Croydon

Waddon Marsh railway station

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Waddon Marsh railway station was in Waddon in the London Borough of Croydon on the West Croydon to Wimbledon Line. It was between West Croydon and Beddington Lane Halt stations. There was pedestrian access by footpath only from Miller Road a side street near Purley Way.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Disused railway stations in Croydon
  • Railway stations closed in 1997
  • Railway stations opened in 1930

Waddon Marsh tram stop

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Waddon Marsh tram stop is a stop on the Tramlink service serving the area between Waddon and Croydon in the London Borough of Croydon. It is close to the commercial areas of the Purley Way. The stop is overshadowed by the giant gasometer of Croydon Gas Works. There was previously a railway station on this site called Waddon Marsh, though all that remains of the previous station is an access path still lined with streetlamps painted BR red.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Tramlink stops in Croydon

Wandle Park

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Wandle Park is the name of two separate parks in London, on the course of the River Wandle and on the Wandle Trail. The Wandle Trail passes through both parks.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • 1890 establishments
  • Parks and open spaces in Croydon

Wandle Park tram stop

Located at 51.36, -0.12 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Wandle Park tram stop is a light rail stop in the London Borough of Croydon in the southern suburbs of London. It serves the residential area between central Croydon and Waddon, and is adjacent to Wandle Park. The tram stop is served by Tramlink route 3 from Wimbledon to New Addington via central Croydon. The tram stop is located on a double track section of line, with platforms on either side of the track. Immediately to the south of the stop, the line reduces to single track and rises on a steep gradient in order to pass over the railway line on a bridge.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Tramlink stops in Croydon

These abstracts have been compiled and located with the help of wikipedia.org, dbpedia.org and geonames.org.