Tunapuna Sightseeing Guide

Tunapuna in Tunapuna/Piarco (region) with it's 17,758 habitants is located in Trinidad and Tobago - about 9 mi (or 15 km) East of Port of Spain, the country's capital town. To learn more about Tunapuna in general, check the Tunapuna destination guide. These are some of the noteworthy things about this place.

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Table of Content

Map of local sightseeing hints

The map features the more popular and well known points of interest from this area.

19 sightseeing spots quickly introduced

Distances are based on the centre of the city/town and sightseeing location. This list contains brief abstracts about monuments, holiday activities, national parcs, museums, organisations and more from the area as well as interesting facts about the region itself. Where available, you'll find the corresponding homepage. Otherwise the related wikipedia article.

Arouca, Trinidad and Tobago

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 3 mi away.
More reading: Arouca, Trinidad and Tobago homepage

Arouca is a town in the East-West Corridor of Trinidad and Tobago located 19 km east of Port of Spain, along the Eastern Main Road. It is located west of Arima, east of Tunapuna and Tacarigua, south of Lopinot, and north of Piarco. It is governed by the Tunapuna-Piarco Regional Corporation. Arouca may be a corruption of Arauca, an Amerindian tribe. During most of the Spanish rule, Arouca was a settlement reserved for Amerindians. However, when the French arrived in 1783 under Governor José Chacon's Cedula de Repoblación the Amerindians were restricted to Arima. Most of the land in Arouca was split between the Tablau and Chaumet families. Arouca steadily grew into a major agricultural center, but the extension of the railroad to Sangre Grande in 1898 lured many people in Arouca to relocate to the more prosperous Sangre Grande valley. Today, it mainly comprises residential housing. There is the Bon Air Primary School, Arouca Anglican, Arouca Girl R. C Arouca Boys R. C and Arouca Government Primary Schools. There is one newly built secondary school: Bon Air High School. Golden Grove Prison is located in Arouca.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Populated places in Trinidad and Tobago

Asa Wright Nature Centre

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 7 mi away.
More reading: Asa Wright Nature Centre homepage

The Asa Wright Nature Centre and Lodge is a nature resort and scientific research station in the Arima Valley of the Northern Range in Trinidad and Tobago. The Centre is one of the top birdwatching spots in the Caribbean; a total of 159 species of birds have been recorded there. The Centre is owned by a non-profit trust.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Arima
  • Biological research institutes
  • Birdwatching
  • Conservation in Trinidad and Tobago
  • Nature centers
  • Research institutes in Trinidad and Tobago
  • Visitor attractions in Trinidad and Tobago

Barataria, Trinidad and Tobago

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 6 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Barataria is a town in Trinidad and Tobago. It is just east of Port of Spain and Laventille and west of San Juan. It is part of the East-West Corridor. Barataria falls under the San Juan-Laventille Regional Corporation. This is a relatively quiet residential area, home to retired and "middle classes" with streets running north-south and east-west with corresponding names, e.g. "Fifth Street". There is the usual suburban mix of churches, shops, bars and auto repair shops. It is not far from the main highways into Port of Spain direct or via the scenic Lady Young Road, and the East-West Corridor. Busy shopping areas and a modern cinema are within walking distance. The busy bus route running parallel with the eastbound highway runs just north of Barataria. The bus route was originally built to provide access to and from Piarco International Airport in case of a national emergency.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Populated places in Trinidad and Tobago

Caura River (Trinidad and Tobago)

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 5 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

The Tacarigua River (commonly known as the Caura River) is a river on the island of Trinidad in the country of Trinidad and Tobago. It originates in the Northern Range and drains the Caura Valley. It passes through the town of Tacarigua in the East-West Corridor before joining the Caroni River. The Caura River is important both recreationally and culturally. Currently the Caura River is at risk to pollution from fertilizers and pesticides used by the farmers within the valley. It was once an Arawak settlement. It was also in a sea of controversy as it was a proposed site for the building of a dam in 1943. And though it was started, it was never completed to this day, and equipment for the construction of this proposed dam still lies there to date. The money was embezzled and still cannot be accounted for. After this fiasco, there were successful attempts to turn Caura in to park for aesthetic purposes and this has proved well done. However, due to the recent spate of crime which has risen to plague the country, it has become a favorite hot spot for crime, with visitors reporting things items stolen to armed car robberies.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Rivers of Trinidad and Tobago

Cunupia

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 6 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Cunupia is a town in central Trinidad. It is part of the Borough of Chaguanas. Cunupia is just northeast of Chaguanas proper. Like Chaguanas itself, Cunupia has experienced rapid growth in recent years, especially in terms of residential developments.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Chaguanas
  • Populated places in Trinidad and Tobago

Curepe

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Curepe is a town in the East-West Corridor of Trinidad and Tobago. It is located west of St Augustine and east of St Joseph. Curepe abuts the St Augustine campus of the University of the West Indies. Many of the students attending the university live in Curepe. Curepe began as a crossroads, where both the Trinidad Government Railway and the Southern Main Road ran south. Although the railway is gone and the Southern Main Road has largely been supplanted by highways, Curepe remains an important transportation hub for private taxis and maxi taxis which ply the route south to San Fernando and Chaguanas. Curepe is administered by the Tunapuna-Piarco Regional Corporation.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Populated places in Trinidad and Tobago

D'Abadie

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 5 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

D'abadie is a suburban community in Trinidad and Tobago. Its Member of Parliament is Anil Roberts. Its estimated population is 26,000 people. Some businesses include Arawak Chicken Factory, D'abadie Discount Hardware Limited, Cedric Dookie Supermarket and PriceSmart Wholesale Club. Some schools include Pinehaven S.D.A. Primary School and D'abadie Government Primary School. One of its attractions is Cleaver Woods, the site of a settlement of remaining indigenous peoples.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Populated places in Trinidad and Tobago

Dr. João Havelange Centre of Excellence

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Dr. João Havelange Centre of Excellence homepage

The Dr. João Havelange Centre of Excellence is a football academy and development suite on the outskirts of Port-of-Spain in Trinidad and Tobago. It is named after João Havelange, the former President of FIFA and the Brazilian Football Confederation. The centre was the idea of Trinidadian MP and CONCACAF President (1990–2011) Jack Warner. The company was registered in October 1996, during FIFA President João Havelange's reign. A second company was registered with the same name in July 1999. The centre was funded by CONCACAF's development money for a four-year presidential term and also required funding from FIFA. It was first used in 1998 (officially opening in December 1999) and is CONCACAF's only development centre. At the planning stage Warner valued the cost of the work would be £16million USD. The FIFA development budget between 1999 and 2002 for the CONCACAF region was $10million USD. In addition, FIFA secured a $6million USD loan from Union Bank of Switzerland, and paid it when no payment came from Caribbean Football Union or CONCACAF. Warner said that the centre is named after João Havelange for agreeing to fund the development. The development, despite being paid for by football bodies was registered in the name of Warner-owned two companies. In 2001, a FIFA goal programme, headed by Warner invested $400k in an indoor facility at the site, in addition FIFA provided a further $100k in a futsal-related 'special fund' and CONCACAF raised $143k. Four years later, a second FIFA goal programme, again headed by Warner invested a further $400k for a new artificial pitch.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • CONCACAF
  • Caribbean Football Union

Hugh Wooding Law School

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Hugh Wooding Law School homepage

The Hugh Wooding Law School (HWLS) is a law school in Trinidad and Tobago.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Educational institutions established in 1973
  • Law in the Caribbean
  • Universities in Trinidad and Tobago

Lopinot

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 6 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Lopinot is a village in Trinidad and Tobago. It is located in the foothills of the Northern Range, just north of Arouca. It is governed by the Tunapuna-Piarco Regional Corporation. Lopinot, the area which was named after Charles Joseph Count de Loppinot (1738–1819) is located five and three quarters of a mile from Arouca. Loppinot was a young knight who rose to the rank of Lieutenant-General in the French army. He left France to serve time in the North-American French colony of Acadie (which is today combined with the Canadian territory of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island). He left the colony of Acadie circa 1755, when the French were expelled from the area. He then headed to Louisiana until he recognized signs of future annexation by the United States. His journey then continued to the Caribbean territory of Santo Domingo (known as Dominican Republic and Haiti today) which was, at the time, one of the wealthiest sugar-producing territories of the world. It was at this time that Loppinot seized the economically viable opportunity to become a sugar planter. He soon amassed great wealth and acquired land, slaves and a good reputation among his fellow associates. However, his stay in Santo Domingo was curtailed as a result of slave uprisings which began in 1791. After fighting alongside the British in an attempt to reclaim the island, he fled when victory proved unattainable. After this stint, Loppinot petitioned the British Secretary of State for the Colonies to get compensation for property lost in Santo Domingo. Thus, when the British annexed Trinidad in 1797, the Secretary of State for the Colonies gave Loppinot instruction to go to the island to receive a grant of land by the Governor, Thomas Picton. Loppinot entered Trinidad in 1800 along with his wife, children and about one hundred slaves but was disappointed to learn that Picton had not been informed by the British Secretary of State for the Colonies and so no grant of land was made. Loppinot remained in Trinidad despite this and purchased a sugar estate in Tacarigua. In 1805, the then Governor, Thomas Hislop appointed him Brigadier-General of the Trinidad Militia. Loppinot used this position to again request a grant of land and this time he was successful. Thus, the Count trekked up the mountains of north Arouca until he discovered flat land amidst the mountainous terrain. He decided this time around to grow cocoa on the estate, La Reconnaissance, which proved a successful venture. Loppinot was later appointed to the Council of Government by the Governor, Ralph Woodford, and remained a member until his death in 1819. The La Reconnaissance estate had remained virtually unchanged until the Government decided to build a dam at the nearby Caura Village. The village was taken over by the government and in order to protect the water supply, in 1943 and 1944, all the adjacent areas including La Reconnaissance were taken over. The village was then renamed "Lopinot" after the man who first established it. After the villagers of Caura were evacuated from the area, they were given the option of re-settling on the newly acquired Government lands at Lopinot. The people transferred the Caura Church (the Church of La Veronica), the la Veronica R.C. School, and their customs, culture and Spanish language to the Patois speaking community of Lopinot. Today, the small village of Lopinot remains largely unchanged despite the fact that the cocoa estates have been cleared to a large extent to facilitate the building of the school, the church and houses. Cocoa estates still remain, and many people still engage in agriculture for a living. Also, remains of his cocoa houses and a jail are still evident in the village. By the 1970s, the Trinidad and Tobago Tourist Board found that the Lopinot Village had great potential as a historic site and began to restore old structures to maintain the historical appeal of the village. Thus, Lopinot Village remains a part of Trinidad and Tobago that blossoms with natural and almost undisturbed beauty, and limitless history to be appreciated by all. The village is reportedly haunted by a soucouyant, and the ghost of Loppinot himself (as seen in Ghost Hunters International).

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Populated places in Trinidad and Tobago

Macoya

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Macoya is a small town located alongside the Churchill-Roosevelt Highway in Trinidad and Tobago. It is located between Tunapuna and Trincity on the island of Trinidad. It is composed primarily of commercial warehouses and a small residential neighbourhood. The Marvin Lee Stadium, a football facility that hosts domestic and international football matches as well as the adjacent João Havelange Centre of Excellence are located in Macoya.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Populated places in Trinidad and Tobago

Marvin Lee Stadium

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Marvin Lee Stadium is a multi-purpose stadium in Macoya, Trinidad and Tobago which is housed together with the Dr. João Havelange Centre of Excellence. It is currently used mostly for football matches and is the home stadium of Joe Public F.C.. The stadium holds approximately 6,000 people. The stadium was named after the National U-20 football captain, a standout defender at the time, who sustained head and neck injuries suffered in a collision with Landon Donovan in an U-20 game versus the USA. He was left paralysed after the incident and succumbed to illness as a result of his weakened state. Lee was later recognised by the TT Government for his service to the Nation and is remembered as a strong-willed individual who refused to let his injuries get the better of him. In 2007, the Stadium became the first in the Caribbean to have an artificial playing surface, costing TT$8 million, which was made possible through a FIFA development grant. The first game was a TT Pro League encounter, where Caledonia AIA scored a narrow win over

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Football venues in Trinidad and Tobago
  • Multi-purpose stadiums in Trinidad and Tobago

Morvant

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 6 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Morvant (pronounced, in the local English dialect, "Morva") is a community in Trinidad and Tobago located east of Port of Spain and west of Barataria.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Populated places in Trinidad and Tobago

Saint Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 2 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

St. Augustine is a town in the north-west of Trinidad and Tobago. It is the site of one of the four campuses of the University of the West Indies. St. Augustine is home to thousands of university students and is now being converted to a university town as the economy of the area is fueled significantly by the spending power of the 60 000 plus university population. Many houses in the general university area have been converted to students' accommodation, but due to the lack of fee regulation, they are generally more than double the cost of university housing. Four of the five halls of residence provided by the University are located here, namely St. John's Hall, Milner Hall, Canada Hall, and Trinity Hall. St. John's Road in St. Augustine is the main access road for Mount St. Benedict, one of the notable, historic sites in Trinidad and Tobago. On the Mount, you can find a Catholic Church along with a monastery and a factory where yogurt is made. On this road, there is also the St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church. The church is opposite to a Community Centre, which underwent renovations and now houses a new field for the residents to engage in football, one of the more popular sports of this area. St. Augustine is also home to the Hugh Wooding Law School, a prestigious law school which attracts many inter-island students of the Caribbean and beyond. In close proximity to the law school is the University of the West Indies, Seismic Research Center, which is the official source of information on earthquakes and volcanoes in the English-speaking Caribbean. St. Augustine is administered by the Tunapuna-Piarco Regional Corporation. There are a number of schools in and around this area of Trinidad. St. Augustine Girls' High School, Lakshmi Girls' Hindu College, St. Augustine Secondary, St. Joseph's Convent, St. Joseph, St. Benedict's R. C Primary School, Curepe Presbyterian School, St. Xavier's Private Primary and The University School. {{#invoke:Coordinates|coord}}{{#coordinates:10|39|N|61|24|W|region:TT_type:city|| |primary |name= }}

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Populated places in Trinidad and Tobago

San Juan, Trinidad and Tobago

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 5 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

San Juan is a town in Trinidad and Tobago. It lies in North Eastern Trinidad, between Barataria and St. Joseph. It is a busy town in the East-West Corridor; the centre of town is known as the Croisee. Population is 54,900 (2004), and it is the third city of the country, larger than the capital. San Juan is governed by the San Juan-Laventille Regional Corporation. Pronounced "Sahwah" by the local people, San Juan is the first major along the East-West Corridor by maxi-taxis and buses. It is located 6 km east of Port of Spain, 7 km west of the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine campus and 18 km away from the Piarco International Airport. Its suburbs are El Soccoro, Aranguez, Bourg Mulatrese, Febeau Village and Petit Bourg. The MTS Plaza in Aranguez is the home of the San Juan-Laventille Regional Corporation. It is bordered by the Caroni Swamp in the south to Santa Cruz in the north and Barataria in the west to Champ Fleurs in the east. The Priority Mall serve as a bus terminal for the town. The town was named after San Juan Baptista (St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of the town and namesake of the Roman Catholic Church on Cemetery Street and the Anglican church on the Eastern Main Road. ) San Juan is home to the internationally known beverage company Solo Beverages. Solo Beverages is a company that provides carbonated beverages that are considered a symbol of Trinidad and Tobago. In June 2010, Japs Fried Chicken open its doors in San Juan. The popular supermarket, Ramesh and Leela is headquartered in the Criosee with another branch located in Febeau Village. Also located on El Socorro Main Road, is Geelal's Super Wholesalers & Distributors Ltd. , a longtime wholesaler with over 25 years of service who specializes in imports and exports. Geelal's has grown so popular that smaller businesses has developed around the distribution centre, there has been fresh coconut water and doubles stands opened across the streets. The main streets of San Juan are primarily business districts, El Socorro Road encompasses car-parts, hardwares, and groceries, Aranguez Main Road hosts mainly fresh fruit and vegetable shops as well as garden supply stores. The area is always bustling with traffic due to the strong economy. The many businesses located on El Socorro Road has boosted the demand of taxi services which led to an expansion of the El Socorro Taxi Stand in the Croisee. The increased traffic has also allowed gas stations and auto repair shops to become successful in the area as well as many fast food restaurants. The local nightlife includes many pubs and bars along the main streets of San Juan, one of the regions most popular bar is Coconuts Bar. The nightlife facilities are available daily until approximately midnight, on Fridays and Saturdays nightlife goes until 5am. Aranguez is home to one of the country's most popular savannahs, Aranguez Savannah. Aranguez Savannah hosts major celebrations and events including Holi, Carnival, cricket games, among many other live concerts.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Populated places in Trinidad and Tobago

Santa Cruz, Trinidad and Tobago

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 8 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

The Santa Cruz Valley stretches between Maraval and San Juan, along the Saddle Road. It lies between the hills of the Northern Range on the island of Trinidad, Trinidad and Tobago. Formerly an important cacao bean producer, much of the valley consists of abandoned cacao plantations or small-scale agriculture. The Santa Cruz Valley is considered prime residential real estate, and many upscale residential developments like Riverside Park, have begun sprouting in the valley. Small villages that form part of Upper Santa Cruz are Cangrejal, Jagan village, Hololo Road, Paxvale, Cantaro, Graceland Heights,Gasparillo, Sam-Boucaud, La Pastora Settlement, and Pipiol. Lower Santa Cruz consists of La Canoa and Bourg Mulatresse, commonly referred to as "Book" in local vernacular. Compared to Upper Santa Cruz, which has a quaint charisma characterized by its rustic tranquility, Lower Santa Cruz is more developed. Santa Cruz is home for a few Primary and Secondary Schools in Trinidad. Some Primary Schools include the; Santa Cruz Presbyterian School, Cantaro Roman Catholic School and Bourg Mulatresse Primary School. San Juan North Secondary School is also situated in the Lower Santa Cruz Valley and it was constructed along the mountain side in Bourg Mulatresse near the Bourg Mulatresse Primary School. Along the Saddle Road, Santa Cruz has two major supermarkets the; Uncle Beddoe's Supermarket and Santa Cruz Food Basket. There are two Postal Delivery Offices and Fuel Stations; Bourg Mulatresse and Cantaro. Santa Cruz is also home for the Santa Cruz Police Station and Santa Cruz Fire Station. The Santa Cruz Fire Station houses the elite Land Search and Rescue Team, this team responds to all search and rescue calls within the Northern Division dealing with automobile accidents, fire emergencies, North Coast Road mishaps and assisting EMTs in responding to medical emergencies beyond road access. Many of Trinidad and Tobago's respected citizens come from this small town, including world-renowned West Indian cricketer Jeffrey Stollmeyer, world-renowned athlete Ato Boldon, poet Eintou Pearl Springer, top parang band The Lara Brothers and Soca star Sanelle Dempster, cricketers Dwayne Bravo, Darren Bravo and textbook author Adesh Seuraj. However, the most admired and adored person from this town is undoubtedly Brian Charles Lara, the retired West Indian cricketer, who is widely regarded as one of the finest batsmen ever to have played the game. From upper Santa Cruz, famous Maracas Beach, a national hotspot, is a conservative 20 minutes away by car.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Populated places in Trinidad and Tobago

Tacarigua

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 1 mi away.
More reading: Tacarigua homepage

Tacarigua is a town in the East-West Corridor of Trinidad and Tobago, located east of Tunapuna and north of Trincity. It is on the banks of the Tacarigua River. It is located between Tunapuna and Arouca and is governed by the Tunapuna-Piarco Regional Corporation. Tacarigua was originally a Spanish encomienda, prior to the relocation of the Amerindians to Arima in 1789. Some of the first mosques were built at Tacarigua in 1850.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Populated places in Trinidad and Tobago

Tunapuna

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 0 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Tunapuna is a town in the East-West Corridor of Trinidad and Tobago.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Populated places in Trinidad and Tobago

Valsayn

Located at 10.63, -61.38 (Lat. / Lng.), less than 3 mi away.
More reading: Wikipedia Article

Valsayn is a town in Trinidad and Tobago. It is located along the East-West Corridor in northern Trinidad between the Eastern Main Road, Uriah Butler Highway, Churchill-Roosevelt Highway and Curepe. Valsayn consists of a small number of residential communities and a shopping mall. It is also the site of Cipriani College of Labour and Co-Operative Studies, the Valsayn campus of the University of Trinidad and Tobago, and has two licenced radio broadcasters, Central Radio 90.5 FM and United Cinemas Limited 103.5 FM.

  • This attraction is classified as:
  • Populated places in Trinidad and Tobago

These abstracts have been compiled and located with the help of wikipedia.org, dbpedia.org and geonames.org.