Explore Nicaragua in North America

Nicaragua
Country Guide

Map of the area of  in

Nicaragua with its capital Managua is located in North America (Central America, bordering both the Caribbean Sea and the North Pacific Ocean). It covers some 129,495 square kilometres (slightly smaller than New York state) with 5,780,000 citizens. Spanish and English are the the official languages used in Nicaragua. It is charing borders with Costa Rica and Honduras.

Nicaragua s a country in Central America. It has coastlines on both the Caribbean Sea, in the east, and the North Pacific Ocean, in the west, and has Costa Rica to the southeast and Honduras to the northwest. Tourism in Nicaragua is growing at 15% to 20% annually. Tourists are coming for the beauty and richness this country has to offer. From eco-tourism, adventure, beach, colonial cities, nightlife, and a low cost of living, Nicaragua has experienced a booming number of tourists from around the world. The places where tourists are hanging out and having a good time are in the colonial cities of Granada and Leon, the Pacific Coast, hiking on the volcanoes, and in the Caribbean coast in the Corn Islands.

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Pictures from the Nicaraguan capital

Have a look at our dedicated photo collection to get a view of what Managua is like. We have selected more pictures from Managua on our dedicated gallery page.

Awesome photos provided by Panoramio are under the copyright of their owners.

Landscape, climate and basic hints for travelling

National Tourism Office

Website: Nicaragua Tourism

Apartado Postal A-122
Managua
Nicaragua

Phone: +505 2223333

The topography features extensive Atlantic coastal plains rising to central interior mountains with narrow Pacific coastal plain interrupted by volcanoes. The average density of population is about 45 per km². The climate in Nicaragua can be described as tropical in lowlands, cooler in highlands. Potential natural disasters are destructive earthquakes or volcanoes, landslides or extremely susceptible to hurricanes.

To reach someone in Nicaragua dial +505 prior to a number. There are 255,000 installed telephones. And there are 3,204,000 registered mobile phones. The cellular networks operate on frequencies of 1900 Mhz. Websites typically end with the top level domain ".ni". If you want to bring electric appliances (e.g. battery charger), keep in mind the local 120V - 60Hz.

Learn more on our Nicaraguan Facts page.

Description of the flag of Nicaragua

Three equal horizontal bands of blue (top), white, and blue with the national coat of arms centered in the white band; the coat of arms features a triangle encircled by the words REPUBLICA DE NICARAGUA on the top and AMERICA CENTRAL on the bottom; the banner is based on the former blue-white-blue flag of the Federal Republic of Central America; the blue bands symbolize the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, while the white band represents the land between the two bodies of water
note: similar to the flag of El Salvador, which features a round emblem encircled by the words REPUBLICA DE EL SALVADOR EN LA AMERICA CENTRAL centered in the white band; also similar to the flag of Honduras, which has five blue stars arranged in an X pattern centered in the white band.

National administrative regions of Nicaragua

Historical background information

The Pacific coast of Nicaragua was settled as a Spanish colony from Panama in the early 16th century. Independence from Spain was declared in 1821 and the country became an independent republic in 1838. Britain occupied the Caribbean Coast in the first half of the 19th century, but gradually ceded control of the region in subsequent decades. Violent opposition to governmental manipulation and corruption spread to all classes by 1978 and resulted in a short-lived civil war that brought the Marxist Sandinista guerrillas to power in 1979. Nicaraguan aid to leftist rebels in El Salvador caused the US to sponsor anti-Sandinista contra guerrillas through much of the 1980s. After losing free and fair elections in 1990, 1996, and 2001, former Sandinista President Daniel ORTEGA Saavedra was elected president in 2006 and reelected in 2011. The 2008 municipal elections, 2010 regional elections, November 2011 presidential elections, and 2012 municipal elections were marred by widespread irregularities. Nicaragua's infrastructure and economy - hard hit by the earlier civil war and by Hurricane Mitch in 1998 - are slowly being rebuilt, but democratic institutions have been weakened under the ORTEGA administration.

Learn more on our Nicaraguan Facts page.

Based on the content from wikitravel.org. The original article can be found here based on the work of these users. Geography information is based on the data provided by geonames.org, CIA world facts book Edition 2010 and 2013, Unesco, DBpedia, wikipedia and others.