Explore Kuwait in Asia

Kuwait
Country Guide

Map of the area of  in

Kuwait with its capital Kuwait City is located in Asia (Middle East, bordering the Persian Gulf). It covers some 17,821 square kilometres (slightly smaller than New Jersey) with 2,596,000 citizens. Arabic and English are the the languages commonly used by the people in Kuwait. It is charing borders with Saudi Arabia and Iraq.

Kuwaitis a country in the Middle East. It is located at the head of the Arabian Gulf, with Iraq to the north and west, and Saudi Arabia to the southwest.Kuwait City is a bustling metropolis of high-rise office buildings, luxury hotels, wide boulevards and well-tended parks and gardens. Its seaport is used by oil tankers, cargo ships and many pleasure craft. Its most dominant landmarks are the Kuwait Towers. Kuwait City is not, however, an attractive city to visit as much of the architecture and its general feel is one of sand blown, dustiness.

Advertising

Landscape, climate and basic hints for travelling

The landscape features flat to slightly undulating desert plain. The average density of population is about 146 per km². The climate in Kuwait can be described as dry desert with intensely hot summers, short, cool winters. Potential threats by nature are sudden cloudbursts are common from October to April and bring heavy rain, which can damage roads and houses or sandstorms and dust storms occur throughout the year but are most common between March and August.

To reach someone in Kuwait dial +965 prior to a number. There are 553,500 installed telephones. And there are 3,876,000 registered mobile phones. The cellular networks operate on frequencies of 900, 1800 Mhz. Websites typically end with the top level domain ".kw". If you want to bring electric appliances (e.g. battery charger), keep in mind the local 240V - 50Hz.

Learn more on our Kuwaiti Facts page.

Description of the flag of Kuwait

Three equal horizontal bands of green (top), white, and red with a black trapezoid based on the hoist side; colors and design are based on the Arab Revolt flag of World War I; green represents fertile fields, white stands for purity, red denotes blood on Kuwaiti swords, black signifies the defeat of the enemy.

National administrative regions of Kuwait

Historical background information

Britain oversaw foreign relations and defense for the ruling Kuwaiti AL-SABAH dynasty from 1899 until independence in 1961. Kuwait was attacked and overrun by Iraq on 2 August 1990. Following several weeks of aerial bombardment, a US-led, UN coalition began a ground assault on 23 February 1991 that liberated Kuwait in four days. Kuwait spent more than $5 billion to repair oil infrastructure damaged during 1990-91. The AL-SABAH family has ruled since returning to power in 1991 and reestablished an elected legislature that in recent years has become increasingly assertive. The country witnessed the historic election in May 2009 of four women to its National Assembly. Amid the 2010-11 uprisings and protests across the Arab world, stateless Arabs, known as bidoon, staged small protests in February and March 2011 demanding citizenship, jobs, and other benefits available to Kuwaiti nationals. Youth activist groups - supported by opposition legislators and the prime minister's rivals within the ruling family - rallied repeatedly in 2011 for an end to corruption and the ouster of the prime minister and his cabinet. Opposition legislators forced the prime minister to resign in late 2011. In October-December 2012, Kuwait witnessed unprecedented protests in response to the Amir''s changes to the electoral law by decree reducing the number of votes per person from four to one. The opposition, led by a coalition of Sunni Islamists, tribalists, some liberals, and myriad youth groups, boycotted the December 2012 legislative election, resulting in a historic number of Shia candidates winning seats. Since 2006, the Amir has dissolved the National Assembly on five occasions (the Constitutional Court annulled the Assembly once in June 2012) and reshuffled the cabinet 12 times, usually citing political stagnation and gridlock between the legislature and the government.

Learn more on our Kuwaiti Facts page.

Based on the content from wikitravel.org. The original article can be found here based on the work of these users. Geography information is based on the data provided by geonames.org, CIA world facts book Edition 2010 and 2013, Unesco, DBpedia, wikipedia and others.