Explore Afghanistan in Asia

Afghanistan
Country Guide

Map of the area of  in

Travel warning information is updated daily: The Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade's advisory service has marked this country as DO NOT TRAVEL. This means that travelling this country can result in potentially life-threatening situations! If you really have to go: Check with your local authorities whether your exact destination is safe.

Afghanistan with its capital Kabul is located in Asia (Southern Asia, north and west of Pakistan). It covers some 647,501 square kilometres (slightly smaller than Texas) with 32,738,000 citizens. Persian, Pushto, Uzbek and Turkmen are the official languages spoken in Afghanistan (consider regional differences). Turkmenistan, China, Iran, Tajikistan, Pakistan and Uzbekistan are bordering countries.

Afghanistan is a landlocked country in the heart of Asia. Traveling in Afghanistan is potentially very dangerous. It has spent the last 3 decades in the news for all the wrong reasons. While visiting has not been advisable for several years, it has much to offer. That said, even the adventurous should consider looking elsewhere for thrill-seeking at the moment. The most pleasant weather in Kabul is during April, May and September.

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Pictures from the Afghan capital

Have a look at our dedicated photo collection to get a view of what Kabul is like. We have selected more pictures from Kabul on our dedicated gallery page.

Awesome photos provided by Panoramio are under the copyright of their owners.

Landscape, climate and basic hints for travelling

The landscape features mostly rugged mountains and plains in north and southwest. The average density of population is about 51 per km². The climate in Afghanistan can be described as arid to semiarid with cold winters and hot summers. Potential threats by nature are damaging earthquakes occur in Hindu Kush mountains or flooding or droughts.

To reach someone in Afghanistan dial +93 prior to a number. There are 129,300 installed telephones. And there are 12,000,000 registered mobile phones. The cellular networks operate on frequencies of 900, 1800 Mhz. Websites typically end with the top level domain ".af". If you want to bring electric appliances (e.g. battery charger), keep in mind the local 220V - 50Hz.

Learn more on our Afghan Facts page.

Description of the flag of Afghanistan

Three equal vertical bands of black (hoist side), red, and green, with the national emblem in white centered on the red band and slightly overlapping the other two bands; the center of the emblem features a mosque with pulpit and flags on either side, below the mosque are numerals for the solar year 1298 (1919 in the Gregorian calendar, the year of Afghan independence from the UK); this central image is circled by a border consisting of sheaves of wheat on the left and right, in the upper-center is an Arabic inscription of the Shahada (Muslim creed) below which are rays of the rising sun over the Takbir (Arabic expression meaning "God is great"), and at bottom center is a scroll bearing the name Afghanistan; black signifies the past, red is for the blood shed for independence, and green can represent either hope for the future, agricultural prosperity, or Islam
note: Afghanistan had more changes to its national flag in the 20th century than any other country; the colors black, red, and green appeared on most of them.

National administrative regions of Afghanistan

Historical background information

Ahmad Shah DURRANI unified the Pashtun tribes and founded Afghanistan in 1747. The country served as a buffer between the British and Russian Empires until it won independence from notional British control in 1919. A brief experiment in democracy ended in a 1973 coup and a 1978 Communist counter-coup. The Soviet Union invaded in 1979 to support the tottering Afghan Communist regime, touching off a long and destructive war. The USSR withdrew in 1989 under relentless pressure by internationally supported anti-Communist mujahedin rebels. A series of subsequent civil wars saw Kabul finally fall in 1996 to the Taliban, a hardline Pakistani-sponsored movement that emerged in 1994 to end the country's civil war and anarchy. Following the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks, a US, Allied, and anti-Taliban Northern Alliance military action toppled the Taliban for sheltering Osama BIN LADIN. The UN-sponsored Bonn Conference in 2001 established a process for political reconstruction that included the adoption of a new constitution, a presidential election in 2004, and National Assembly elections in 2005. In December 2004, Hamid KARZAI became the first democratically elected president of Afghanistan and the National Assembly was inaugurated the following December. KARZAI was re-elected in August 2009 for a second term. Despite gains toward building a stable central government, a resurgent Taliban and continuing provincial instability - particularly in the south and the east - remain serious challenges for the Afghan Government.

Learn more on our Afghan Facts page.

Based on the content from wikitravel.org. The original article can be found here based on the work of these users. Geography information is based on the data provided by geonames.org, CIA world facts book Edition 2010 and 2013, Unesco, DBpedia, wikipedia and others.